Conservation Districts in Maine Integral to Statewide Natural Resources Initiatives

The Maine Association of Conservation Districts (MACD) recently convened at the Spectacular Events Center in Bangor for its Annual Winter Meetings. The 16 conservation districts in Maine that were represented at the meeting serve as the bridge between citizens and local, state and federal agencies. They provide conservation leadership, teach the value of natural resources, and help plan and implement voluntary programs to both prevent and solve local environmental problems. They work with many partners to provide assistance to the public for their use of land, soil, water, wildlife, forest, plants and other natural resources.

At this meeting preparations were made for several statewide conservation initiatives, including natural resource assessments to be conducted in Spring, 2016, throughout all counties in Maine. These assessments, to be conducted in partnership with the USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), will help determine local conservation priorities and also provide a comprehensive framework for evaluating NRCS technical and financial conservation assistance in Maine.

Presentations were also made on the numerous soil health initiatives underway in Maine. Dr. Brandon Smith, the Northeast Team Leader for new NRCS Soil Health Division, and Tony Jenkins, NRCS State Resource Conservationist, spoke about the soil health challenges facing farmers. They also discussed NRCS plans for a broader adoption of agriculture management practices that will maintain or enhance soil functions. “Healthy, and sustainable agricultural soils are measured by ecological factors such as organic matter and biology, as well as by economic values, such as agricultural productivity and crop yields,” Jenkins explained.

The meeting also addressed a number of soil health initiatives to assist potato farmers in Aroostook County. Angie Wotton, Southern Aroostook Soil and Water Conservation District (SWCD) Director and Kassy Michaud, Central Aroostook SWCD Executive Director, gave presentations on their work with multiple public and private partners, including the Maine Department of Agriculture, Conservation and Forestry (DACF) and the Maine Potato Board, to help potato farmers improve soil health. These initiatives will also help farmers prevent soil erosion and improve water quality using innovative cover cropping, green manures and other technical assistance provided through the Regional Conservation Partnership Program (RCPP). The RCPP promotes coordination between NRCS and its partners to deliver conservation assistance to producers and landowners.

A MACD Advisory Council Meeting with DACF’s Commissioner Walt Whitcomb focused on the gains being made in local, sustainable agriculture in Maine. Whitcomb noted that “Maine is the largest agricultural producing state in New England, and the state has prime farming soils and a lot of untapped potential,” with Maine’s primary agricultural products being potatoes, blueberries, apples, eggs, dairy and maple syrup. Whitcomb also noted that the DACF is going to continue to make the partnership with conservation districts a cost-efficient and effective local delivery system.

A recently awarded DACF Invasive Forest Pest grant will provide outreach and education in several counties in Maine through the MACD Employees Committee Technical Delivery Team. The outreach and education will serve to prevent the spread of invasive pests to Maine, and also to contain invasive pests that have already come to the state. Because Maine’s well-managed forests provide an approximate $8 billion industry each year in Maine, from forest products and the forest-based recreation economy, monitoring, management and education are all important to sustaining the state’s forestlands. Jeannie Federico, Oxford County SWCD Education and Outreach Coordinator, spoke of the threat to Maine’s forests from the Emerald Ash Borer and other invasive pests, and said, “There are lessons to be learned from those states that have already been damaged by these invasive pests, in addition to all the research now being done to slow their spread. By educating the public, Maine’s conservation districts can help to mitigate the damage to its beautiful forests.”

During the MACD Board of Director’s Meeting, the torch was passed to Bruce Talley of Medford, Maine, to begin his three-year tenure as the newly elected MACD President. Talley, who also serves as a Supervisor of the Piscataquis County SWCD, notes that “healthy soil and water are as essential as the air that we breathe.” He is excited to work with conservation districts throughout Maine, and their conservation partners, to plan, implement and manage the state’s natural resources for future generations.

2016 MACD Leadership

2016 MACD Leadership

Farm Pond Walk and Talk Workshop

A morning of farm pond construction and maintenance tips will be held Saturday, September 26, 2015 from 8:30 A.M until noon. The session will start at the Topsham Fire Hall at 1 Main Street then move to the Bisson Farm at 116 Meadow Road in Topsham. After a time of classroom instruction, participants will go to the farm pond and discuss management practices. Refreshments will be available during the classroom portion.

Pre-registration is required by September 21. The cost is $7.50 per person or $10.00 per couple and $11.00 each after September 15. The registration fee must be sent with the workshop registration form and will offset the cost of morning refreshments provided. Notify Jane Heikkinen at 207-753-9400 ext 400 or email her at janeheikkinen@oxfordnetworks.net if special accommodations are needed. The walk to the pond will not be handicap accessible.

The FARM POND Walk and Talk is being sponsored by the Androscoggin Valley Soil and Water Conservation District, hosted by the Topsham Fire Department and the Bisson Farm Family in Topsham and facilitated by USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service Engineer Candi Gilpatric. AVSWCD is an equal opportunity employer and program provider. This program will offer a relaxed, informal training opportunity, new pond construction tips, ideas for pond maintenance, helps for planning pond use, view of two farm ponds, practices used and an interactive learning experience with a question and answer time.

Invasive Forest Insect Outreach Volunteer Training

 

Lewiston, Maine April 1, 2015: People interested in learning how to recognize invasive tree pests, and who are interested in protecting our natural resources and people working in the wood products industry should attend this training at the USDA Service Center at 254 Goddard Road in Lewiston, which is being offered in partnership by the Maine Department of Agriculture, Conservation and Forestry with Androscoggin Valley Soil and Water Conservation District. The purpose for this workshop is to train people to recognize, report and to spread awareness about the Asian longhorned beetle (ALB), the emerald ash borer (EAB), and hemlock woolly adelgid (HWA) and other invasive tree pests. Participants will learn how to disseminate information to the public to help spread awareness. The workshop will begin at 10:00 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. The cost is $5.00 per person to cover the costs for lunch. Pre-registration is required and must be received no later than March 25. No refunds are given without a notice given by March 27. In case of inclement weather the event will be held on April 8, same place and time. FMI and to register contact Jane Heikkinen at (207-753-9400 ext 400 or email to janeheikkinen@oxfordnetworks.net
Invasive Tree Pests pose a serious threats to the trees and forests of Maine. The best defense for our trees and forests is early detection by people who work with trees, those who enjoy the outdoors, and those involved in community education. The Forest Pest Outreach Project will provide materials and guidance for volunteers. Training topics will include: potential impact of ALB, EAB, HWA in the State of Maine; current management activities; identification and life cycles; how to recognize these pests and their damage; how to report a suspect insect; other invasive forest pests; sharing what you have learned; host tree identification; and community response planning. Continuing education credits from the Board of Pesticide and SAF will be offered.

Basic and Advanced Training in Erosion and Sediment Control Practices

Are you certified to work near water bodies? As of July 1, 2013, work within 250 feet of any water body (the shoreland zone) requires a certified contractor on site. The Basic and Advanced Training in Erosion and Sediment Control Practices course will be held on Friday, November 21st from 8:00AM to 4:30PM at the Penquis Higher Education Center in Dover-Foxcroft. This course is necessary in order to become certified in erosion control practices by the Maine Department of Environmental Protection (DEP), and is designed for contractors, municipal code enforcement officers, consultants, engineers and public works employees. By attending this session, you qualify to become DEP certified in erosion and sediment control practices after the completion of a site evaluation.

 

In addition to sections on “Why Erosion Control is Important”, and “Erosion and How it Happens”, participants are provided with information on the proper selection, installation and maintenance of practices such as sediment barriers, mulch, vegetative stabilization, riprap, etc. You will also learn about new state-of-the-art erosion control techniques and ways to save time and money on your construction projects, as well as become eligible for discounts, expedited DEP permitting and other free educational resources.

 

If you are in need of this training, the Maine DEP’s Nonpoint Source Training and Resource Center and the Piscataquis County Soil and Water Conservation District (PCSWCD) urge you to take this Basic and Advanced Training Session in Erosion and Sediment Control Practices this fall. Refreshments, lunch, and a manual will be provided. Code Enforcement Officers will earn 7 Shoreland Zoning Credits. For more information about the benefits of contractor certification, visit www.maine.gov/dep/training or call the PCSWCD at 564-2321, Extension 3. To register for this course, visit the Penquis Valley Adult Education Cooperative’s (PVAEC) on-line registration portal at www.pvaec.maineadulted.org or call the PVAEC at 564-6525. The course is $85.00, or $95.00 if registering after November 7th. The registration deadline is November 14th. Don’t lose work opportunities – get certified – register for this course today.

Soil and Water Stewardship Week is April 27 to May 3, 2014

In 1955, the National Association of Conservation Districts began a national program to encourage Americans to focus on stewardship. Stewardship Week is officially celebrated from the last Sunday in April to the first Sunday in May. It is one of the world’s largest conservation-related observances.

The program relies on locally-led conservation districts sharing and promoting stewardship and conservation activities. Districts provide conservation and stewardship field days, programs, workshops and additional outreach efforts throughout their community to educate citizens about the need to care for our resources. Many district activities extend beyond the one week observance to include an entire year of outreach.

The Stewardship concept involves personal and social responsibility, including a duty to learn about and improve natural resources as we use them wisely, leaving a rich legacy for future generations.

One definition of Stewardship is “the individual’s responsibility to manage his life and property with proper regard to the rights of others.” E. William Anderson suggests stewardship “is essentially a synonym for conservation.”

Stewardship Week helps to remind us all of the power each person has to conserve natural resources and improve the world. When everyone works together with their local conservation district, that power continuously grows. We have seen these good deeds multiply across the nation’s network of conservation districts and the results are spectacular!

When the land does well for its owner, and the owner does well by his land—when both end up better by reason of their partnership—then we have conservation. – Aldo Leopold

Stewardship week each year is always the last Sunday in April to the first Sunday in May.